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[[Image:PathoQ.png|thumb| A pathologic Q wave]]
 
[[Image:PathoQ.png|thumb| A pathologic Q wave]]
Pathologic Q waves are a sign of '''previous [[Myocardial Infarction|myocardial infarction]]'''. The are the result of absence of electrical activity. A myocardial infarction can be thought of as an elecrical 'hole' as scar tissue is electrically dead and therefore results in pathologic Q waves. Pathologic Q waves are not an early sign of myocardial infarction, but '''generally take several hours to days to develop'''. One pathologic Q waves have developed they rarely go away. However, if the myocardial infarction is reperfused early (e.g. as a result of percutaneous coronary intervention) stunned myocardial tissue can recover and pathologic Q waves disappear. In all other situations they '''usually persist indefinitely'''.
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Pathologic Q waves are a sign of '''previous [[Myocardial Infarction|myocardial infarction]]'''. The are the result of absence of electrical activity. A myocardial infarction can be thought of as an elecrical 'hole' as scar tissue is electrically dead and therefore results in pathologic Q waves. Pathologic Q waves are not an early sign of myocardial infarction, but '''generally take several hours to days to develop'''. Once pathologic Q waves have developed they rarely go away. However, if the myocardial infarction is reperfused early (e.g. as a result of percutaneous coronary intervention) stunned myocardial tissue can recover and pathologic Q waves disappear. In all other situations they '''usually persist indefinitely'''.
    
The precise criteria for pathologic Q waves have been debated. Here we present the latest definition as accepted by the ESC and ACC.<cite>Alpert</cite>
 
The precise criteria for pathologic Q waves have been debated. Here we present the latest definition as accepted by the ESC and ACC.<cite>Alpert</cite>

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