Difference between revisions of "Pathologic Q Waves"

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{{Chapter|Myocardial Infarction}}
 
{{Chapter|Myocardial Infarction}}
 
[[Image:PathoQ.png|thumb| A pathologic Q wave]]
 
[[Image:PathoQ.png|thumb| A pathologic Q wave]]
Pathologic Q waves are a sign of '''previous [[Myocardial Infarction|myocardial infarction]]'''. The are the result of absence of electrical activity. A myocardial infarction can be thought of as an elecrical 'hole' as scar tissue is electrically dead and therefore results in pathologic Q waves. Pathologic Q waves are not an early sign of myocardial infarction, but '''generally take several hours to days to develop'''. Once pathologic Q waves have developed they rarely go away. However, if the myocardial infarction is reperfused early (e.g. as a result of percutaneous coronary intervention) stunned myocardial tissue can recover and pathologic Q waves disappear. In all other situations they '''usually persist indefinitely'''.
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Pathologic Q waves are a sign of '''previous [[Myocardial Infarction|myocardial infarction]]'''. They are the result of absence of electrical activity. A myocardial infarction can be thought of as an elecrical 'hole' as scar tissue is electrically dead and therefore results in pathologic Q waves. Pathologic Q waves are not an early sign of myocardial infarction, but '''generally take several hours to days to develop'''. Once pathologic Q waves have developed they rarely go away. However, if the myocardial infarction is reperfused early (e.g. as a result of percutaneous coronary intervention) stunned myocardial tissue can recover and pathologic Q waves disappear. In all other situations they '''usually persist indefinitely'''.
  
 
The precise criteria for pathologic Q waves have been debated. Here we present the latest definition as accepted by the ESC and ACC.<cite>Thygesen</cite>
 
The precise criteria for pathologic Q waves have been debated. Here we present the latest definition as accepted by the ESC and ACC.<cite>Thygesen</cite>

Revision as of 13:42, 18 January 2010

This is part of: Myocardial Infarction
A pathologic Q wave

Pathologic Q waves are a sign of previous myocardial infarction. They are the result of absence of electrical activity. A myocardial infarction can be thought of as an elecrical 'hole' as scar tissue is electrically dead and therefore results in pathologic Q waves. Pathologic Q waves are not an early sign of myocardial infarction, but generally take several hours to days to develop. Once pathologic Q waves have developed they rarely go away. However, if the myocardial infarction is reperfused early (e.g. as a result of percutaneous coronary intervention) stunned myocardial tissue can recover and pathologic Q waves disappear. In all other situations they usually persist indefinitely.

The precise criteria for pathologic Q waves have been debated. Here we present the latest definition as accepted by the ESC and ACC.[1]

Definition of a pathologic Q wave
Any Q-wave in leads V2–V3 ≥ 0.02 s or QS complex in leads V2 and V3
Q-wave ≥ 0.03 s and > 0.1 mV deep or QS complex in leads I, II, aVL, aVF, or V4–V6 in any two leads of a contiguous lead grouping (I, aVL,V6; V4–V6; II, III, and aVF)
R-wave ≥ 0.04 s in V1–V2 and R/S ≥ 1 with a concordant positive T-wave in the absence of a conduction defect

Notes

  • Absence of pathologic Q waves does not exclude a myocardial infarction!
  • Lead III often shows Q waves, which are not pathologic as long as Q waves are absent in leads II and aVF (the contiguous leads)

For those interested: the Minnesota Code Classification System for Electrocardiographic Findings contains a very extensive definition of pathologic Q waves.


References

  1. Thygesen K, Alpert JS, White HD, Joint ESC/ACCF/AHA/WHF Task Force for the Redefinition of Myocardial Infarction., Jaffe AS, Apple FS, Galvani M, Katus HA, Newby LK, Ravkilde J, Chaitman B, Clemmensen PM, Dellborg M, Hod H, Porela P, Underwood R, Bax JJ, Beller GA, Bonow R, Van der Wall EE, Bassand JP, Wijns W, Ferguson TB, Steg PG, Uretsky BF, Williams DO, Armstrong PW, Antman EM, Fox KA, Hamm CW, Ohman EM, Simoons ML, Poole-Wilson PA, Gurfinkel EP, Lopez-Sendon JL, Pais P, Mendis S, Zhu JR, Wallentin LC, Fernández-Avilés F, Fox KM, Parkhomenko AN, Priori SG, Tendera M, Voipio-Pulkki LM, Vahanian A, Camm AJ, De Caterina R, Dean V, Dickstein K, Filippatos G, Funck-Brentano C, Hellemans I, Kristensen SD, McGregor K, Sechtem U, Silber S, Tendera M, Widimsky P, Zamorano JL, Morais J, Brener S, Harrington R, Morrow D, Lim M, Martinez-Rios MA, Steinhubl S, Levine GN, Gibler WB, Goff D, Tubaro M, Dudek D, and Al-Attar N. Universal definition of myocardial infarction. Circulation. 2007 Nov 27;116(22):2634-53. DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.187397 | PubMed ID:17951284 | HubMed [Thygesen]
  2. Alpert JS, Thygesen K, Antman E, and Bassand JP. Myocardial infarction redefined--a consensus document of The Joint European Society of Cardiology/American College of Cardiology Committee for the redefinition of myocardial infarction. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000 Sep;36(3):959-69. PubMed ID:10987628 | HubMed [Alpert]

All Medline abstracts: PubMed | HubMed