Difference between revisions of "Atrial Rhythm"

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Atrial rhythm resembles sinusrhythm, but origins from a different atrial focus. It can be recognised by the abnormal configuration of the p-wave. Often the p-wave is negative in AVF, as is seen in the example.
 
Atrial rhythm resembles sinusrhythm, but origins from a different atrial focus. It can be recognised by the abnormal configuration of the p-wave. Often the p-wave is negative in AVF, as is seen in the example.
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[[File:E0003196.png|thumb|Conversion of sinus bradycardia to atrial rhythm is sometimes seen in young patients with sinus bradycardia.]]
 
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Revision as of 06:04, 19 December 2012

This is part of: Supraventricular Rhythms
Atrial Rhythm
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Atrial rate 50-100 bpm
Ventricular rate 1:1
Regularity regular
Origin atrial
P-wave present, but different from sinus rhythm
Effect of adenosine slows down
Example ECG: Atrial rhythm. In this example the sinus node stopped pacing due to ischemia during an atrial infarction. The p-wave is positive in I, negative in III and AVF. The atrial pacemaker is thus situated at the bottom of the right atrium, close to the AV node.
Example ECG2: {{{example2}}}

Atrial rhythm resembles sinusrhythm, but origins from a different atrial focus. It can be recognised by the abnormal configuration of the p-wave. Often the p-wave is negative in AVF, as is seen in the example.

Conversion of sinus bradycardia to atrial rhythm is sometimes seen in young patients with sinus bradycardia.